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Old 01-25-2004, 02:18 PM   #1
Dirk Amoeba
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Talking Advice for Aspiring Authors! (It's baa-aack!)

Advice for Aspiring authors has been around since the old days, before EZboard, when Pojo had a UBB. It was written to help Pokemon fanfiction writers, and posted in that forum. When the EZboard replaced the UBB, it was reposted. Since that time, it has been used in various places all over the net.

Here is the text of the article as it was most recently posted, by Clare:


This article was originally written by Murgatroyd to help people with their Pokemon fanfics. This is a revised version for use with various fandoms - I've kept the Pokemon references in as examples, but I've also added a few of my own from various fandoms.

The Basics

As I have read the various works posted on this board, I have noticed many of the same problems over and over. Here are some general guidelines to follow when writing your fics:

1) Proper Use of the Keyboard.
There are several useful keys on the keyboard:

Enter/Return: This is one of the most useful keys. Use it whenever you have finished with one idea and are ready to move on to the next paragraph. Use it when one person has finished speaking, and another is about to start. When doing so, hit it twice, to produce a blank line between paragraphs. This makes it a lot easier for your readers to tell where your paragraphs start and end. Large blocks of uninterrupted text are hard to read.

Shift: Another important key. Hold it down when typing the first letter of a sentence, the first letter of a name, or the letter I when using it as the first person singular subject pronoun.

Caps Lock: Often used as a substitute for the 'Shift' key. Don't do it. Text should not be in all capital letters unless someone is SHOUTING!

The Spacebar: Hit it once after every word or comma, twice after a period.

Tab: Unfortunately, this does not work to indent paragraphs on these boards. This is why a blank line between paragraphs is essential.

Other Keys: Your keyboard, unless it is defective, comes with a full complement of letters. Don't be afraid to use them. There is no reason to type 'u' instead of 'you', or indeed to use any abbreviation you learned in a chat room. There is no penalty for taking a few seconds longer to type complete words.

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2) Tips on Composition.

Paragraphs: Use these as your basic unit of composition. Each paragraph should be used to set forth a single idea. If a paragraph seems too long, it probably contains multiple ideas, and should be split up for clarity. If it seems too short, expand on the idea.

Sentences: A sentence should contain exactly one action or statement of existence. If it contains more than one, split it into two or more. If it contains less than one, finish the sentence. Run-on sentences are often confusing, while fragments make the reader feel that something is missing.

Description: Make sure that your reader can visualize what is happening. Don't just say something like "Joe walked along enjoying the scenery". This gives no indication of whether the scenery he is enjoying is a redwood forest, a beach at sunset, or the Grand Canyon.

A description is not just a list of attributes. When describing a character, don't just list their name, age, height, weight, hair color, and current Pokemon team, Digimon partner, Yu-Gi-Oh deck, Saiyjin status or whatever is relevent to the fandom you're writing for. Bring this information out gradually when the person appears in a story. Don't have Joe meet a trainer named Fred who is 12 years old, has green eyes and red hair, is three and a half feet tall, and whose Pokemon are Squirtle, Pikachu, Butterfree, Grimer, Tauros, and Krabby. Have Joe see a short, red-haired kid with startlingly green eyes, and talk to him. Have names mentioned early in the conversation. The Pokemon may be either revealed in a battle, or introduced individually during the conversation.

The last few sentences apply to non-Pokemon fics as well - just substitute relevent details. For example, in "Harry Potter" fanfics, do not have Jane meet a kid named Mike, who has brown hair and brown eyes, is a second year Hufflepuff, has a pet barn owl and uses an oak-and-unicorn-hair wand. Instead, have Jane meet and talk to a brown-haired kid. Let them exchange names and houses - their owls and wands may either be featured in the scene or introduced into the conversation.

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3) Other General Advice.

Plot: Try to be original. "Joe is 10 (or 11 or 12) years old and about to start his Pokemon journey. He goes to Professor (insert tree here) and gets a (insert Pokemon here)" has been done too many times already. "Joe is a 10-year-old from Pallet Town and about to start his Pokemon journey. He accidentally sleeps in, and by the time he gets to Professor Oak's lab, all the starters have been taken, so he gets a Pikachu" is so old everyone is sick of it.

For non-Pokemon fics, again, try to avoid getting too cliched. You will probably have a fair idea of what is considered to be cliched in your fandom, but I will give you a couple of examples:

Digimon: "Jack and his friends are at summer camp when they find some strange devices that turn out to be Digivices and get zapped to the Digital World where each of them hooks up with (insert one Digimon for each character)" is basically a rehash of what happens in the tv series with the author's own characters substituted for the ones from canon.

Harry Potter: "Tina thinks she is an ordinary girl until, shortly before her eleventh birthday, she gets a letter telling her she has "been accepted to Hogwarts School of Witchcraft and Wizardry". Armed with the stuff she buys in Diagon Alley, she goes off to Hogwarts and gets sorted into (insert one of the four houses)". Same as above and there's a good reason to avoid rehashing canon, aside from the possibility of annoying readers who prefer to see a little originality - and it's called "plagiarism". Plagiarism is where you take someone else's idea and TRY to pass it off as your own. Do NOT do this as it could land you in all sorts of trouble, both on and off the board.

Try to be reasonable. A new trainer is not going to start with a Legendary, or even rare, Pokemon. The standard starter Pokemon were selected for a reason: They are easy for professors to obtain whenever new trainers are about to start, they can be controlled by beginners, and with proper training, they can become quite powerful. Likewise, it is extremely difficult, if not impossible, to catch any of the Legendary Pokemon. They are simply too powerful. If you have seen either of the movies, think about it. Mew or Mewtwo can deflect any attack you try with minimal effort. Consider the scene in The Power of One where Ash's Pikachu (which has been known to defeat Rock and Ground Types) meets Zapdos. Compare their relative power levels. Now think about how hard it would be to defeat Zapdos. This can be applied to any of the Legendary Pokemon. No trainer will have one unless it has a good reason to want to accompany that trainer.

Again the basic essence of this applies whatever your fandom. In Digimon fics, try to keep your characters' Digimon at the early stages of Digivolution outside of battle scenes and you should certainly think twice before introducing a super-powerful Digivolution of your own creation unless there is a VALID reason for having it in your fic. For example, your characters might be up against a Digimon so powerful that their own Digimon can't defeat it in the usual way. Also, in Dragonball fics, don't make too many characters go Super-Saiyjin too early on or without a good reason. And, if it's a Harry Potter fic, don't have the characters use magic beyond that which they would reasonably be expected to know at whatever stage of their magical training they've reached. If you think about it, tasks such as turning buttons into beetles and levitating feathers are pretty easy compared to some of the stuff adult wizards can do.

But, whatever your fandom, you should always THINK before adding something that seems abnormally powerful. Ask yourself if you really need to have whatever it is in your story or whether your story can function just as well (if not better) without it.

Characters: Make your characters real. Give them strengths and weaknesses. Inherently superior characters who win each battle effortlessly, are smarter than Hermione and so forth are boring. So are incompetent members of Team Rocket. So is Gym-Leader-who can't-stand-being-defeated. In short, don't use stereotypes, be it surly-Slytherin-who-hates-anyone-who-isn't-of-pure-wizard-blood or something more general such as beautiful-blonde-who-doesn't-DO-much-except-marry-the-handsome-hero-at-the-end. The latter can be especially annoying to female readers. Remember that we are living in the early twenty-first century so there's no reason why your female characters can't play just as active a role as the males. Check out something like Jean M Auel's Earth's Children books or the tv series Xena: Warrior Princess if you want to see strong female characters in action.

Spelling/Grammar: Write your story in a word-processing program. Use the spellchecker, but don't depend on it completely. It can tell whether your word matches the spelling of a real word, but it cannot tell whether it is the word you wanted to use. Use grammar checkers with extreme care. They cannot actually understand what you are saying, and often make mistakes.

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4) My Personal Advice:
"My" means Murgatroyd here

Note that the contents of this section reflect my personal preferences. Other good writers may disagree with me.

Battles: I generally dislike sentences of the form "(Pokemon/Digimon or whatever it is) used (name of attack, spell etc)". You are describing what the character does. In a real-world battle, a Pokemon would not "use Bite on" its opponent; it would "bite" its opponent. There are, however, exceptions to this. If there is no verb for the action, go ahead and say "Bulbasaur used Leech Seed", "Biyomon used Spiral Twister", "Sophie used Wingardium Leviosa" or anything that's relevent to your fandom. Still, try to avoid "used (name of attack, spell etc)". Better options would be "fired a hyperbeam at (enemy)", "hit (enemy) with (attack)", "cast a __________ spell/charm/curse" etc.

Additionally, the GameBoy battle format makes no sense in the context of a real battle. A Pokemon in a real battle would not just attack, then stand there waiting for its opponent to attack. In a real battle, you would have no time to go in and administer a potion or antidote to your Pokemon. Watch the TV show or re-read the books for your chosen fandom for a reasonable depiction of what battles, wizards' duels and so on would be like.

GameBoy Terminology in general: Try to avoid it. In the real world, referring to something as "Level 17" is meaningless. Pokemon have varying levels of power and experience, but don't just summarize all of this with a single number. In the world of your fanfic, Pokemon (and anything similar such as Digimon) are real, living creatures. They are individuals. They have their own strengths, weaknesses, and skills.

The only thing worse than referring to "levels" is referring to "hit points", "power points", or any of the "statistics" (attack, defense, "special defense", etc). Avoid use of these terms at all costs.

original text by Murgatroyd - amended by Clare

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Characters

Characters are fun, aren't they?

The characters of a story determine much of whether or not the story is likeable. If a story has a killer plot, but has unbelievable characters, chances are that it'll fall. People like to be able to connect with the characters they read about. It's what keeps them tied into the story.

Most people feel that they need to know what happens to the characters. If they die, if they succeed in their quest, etc. Character development doesn't always have to be deep, but readers definitely appreciate a good character. How about some tips?

Unbelievable Strength

Don't make a character unbelievably strong. If you have a normal kid, he (or she) acts and reacts like a normal kid would. You can't have a normal kid get shot and get over it in half an hour. A normal kid isn't going to forget a bullet wound! If the kid is even conscious . . .

This is true with all characters. They cannot have an unbelievably strong amount of power. If you have a Pokemon fic about a kid, it usually doesn't work if the kid has eight Legendaries. Likewise, Harry Potter fics about kids who become Animagi with very little effort are a bad idea - if you read The Prisoner Of Azkaban, you'll see that it states SPECIFICALLY that becoming an Animagus is so difficult that only a handful officially exist. In short, keep Mary-Sues and Gary-Stus out of your stories as much as possible - there are several Mary-Sue tests out there that you could run your characters through to make sure you haven't fallen into any one of a number of character-creation traps.

Believable Strength

It is quite possible to have a strong character. Sometimes the strength can be attributed to special powers, if you work with fantasy. These are the easiest to deal with, perhaps because they can be there because they were innate.

With "real people"; in fics, this can be somewhat hard. There can be characters who have unbending will to go on, or even derive pleasure from pain (Anyone seems "Tomorrow Never Dies";? Stamper is a prime example of this!). To make a character like this believable, the characteristics must be hard and strong.

As an example, Salvador is a strong guy with a hard will to continue. He never fails to work hard, especially when it is for his work (he works for the Rockets). He is willing to take any and all pain necessary on the way to achieving his goals. Throughout the story, Salvador has sustained minor injuries, and kept his strong will. When he is faced with an agent of another Team, however, he will sustain a much larger one.

"Salvador narrowed his eyes in concentration, debating whether or not he should leap forward and attack or not. There were certainly other alternatives. He could try to throw his empty gun at the man. He could hold back for a few moments, though it would most likely lead to being shot.

After a moment, Salvador decided that he could take it no more. His way of doing something was to go ahead and do it. He wasn't going to change that because a guy had a gun at his head. If he was killed, that was it. He wanted to go down fighting. He leapt forward with a speed that surprised him, but, unfortunately, failed to surprise the dark man.

Even as Salvador lunged forward, reaching for the man, he could hear the gun being fired. Salvador felt the dark man step back, and then felt the force of the bullet piercing into his chest. He cringed in agony, almost screamed. He felt bones shatter around his organs, felt a bolt of heat near his lungs. For a moment he tottered and nearly fell to the floor. However, he was able to hear his earlier thoughts, those that had stated that he didn't need to worry about being killed. These thoughts kept him standing.

Salvador saw the form of the man in front of him. Though it was becoming blurry, he knew he could attack, maybe even hit. Maybe he was going to die, but he didn't care. Once more, Salvador lunged forward."

Of course, a character doesn't need to be strong all the way through to have moments of strength. A person can definitely find courage during a traumatic moment, before a possible death or the like. Strength lies deep in everyone. Depending on the character, it can be found at different levels. The main point is, don't make a weak character suddenly act strongly all of the time. Readers won't swallow that too well.

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Alternate points of view

These are very useful when developing a character. While one character is thinking about his or herself, you realize what he/she feels about the traits he/she has. A reader can also make insights about the character by what he/she thinks of others. For example:

"Lydia knew that she didn't like Chad very much. The truth was that she hated him, loathed him. The boy always seemed to be in some sort of trouble, whether it was because he had been caught talking one too many times in class or because he had been caught stealing from the local convenience store.

Maybe it'd be better to say that Lydia distrusted Chad. She didn't know him very well, and didn't want to. He seemed to be the kind of guy who would stand in a dark alley, smoking a cigarette and waiting, just waiting for some innocent bystander to walk by and . . .

Lydia shook her head vigorously. Of course Chad wasn't doing that, he was too busy with homework and the cross team. Still, it was a feasible idea, one that could happen in the near future. She felt this strongly, and couldn't shake her dislike for Chad."

In reading this from Lydia's POV, you should be able to realize that she dislikes Chad. You can see that she distrusts him because of his actions. She seems to be stuck on certain ideas, and has a sort of prejudice towards those who seem "untrustworthy." She judges before she understand anything. You can also see that she has some sort of imagination.To carry development even further, it's good to write what other characters observe about their fellows. For example:

"Julia didn't understand why Lydia always seemed to walk on the other side of the hall when Chad walked by. It was always a movement that could almost be absent-minded, a simple move to the other side. Julie didn't think so, though. Not when it was always done.

Julia didn't think Chad was a bad guy at all. He certainly didn't deserve to be avoided like he was some sort of disease. Although Lydia was her friend, Julia sometimes had trouble understanding Lydia's short-sightedness."

This further pushes the fact that Lydia doesn't look below the surface. It also shows that she has perhaps made wrong judgment of Chad. Obviously, you can do a better job of conveying information by using various POVs than I just did. It is a very useful technique, and I recommend it.

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Names

Names can be quite helpful in defining a character, too. A character's name can reveal certain traits about him or her, contradict his or her traits, have a strong meaning to the story, or mean nothing at all. Using a variety of names can be helpful. While it's fine to use names such as Rob, Jim, and Amanda, it's good to mix these in with less common names. I suppose this isn't quite character information, but it stays here because I don't feel like putting it elsewhere. Names such as Angel can be used to either contradict or convey the characteristics of a character

"Angel fit her name to a level of perfection that seemed undeniably firm. Her practical, caring behavior, along with her endless amount of forgiveness, seemed to fit nearly everyone's idea of angelic. Her hair seemed to be spun of gold, and her body had been shaped to a soft faultlessness."

Or:

"Angel's eyes blazed with anger as she watched the man before her. She had a short temper, and certainly wasn't the most mild-mannered person in the world. Both Angel and the man knew that she could kill him without a second thought. For a moment, however, she simply glared, piercing eyes glaring out from under her black bangs, standing with an intensity that seemed to scream that she was a murderer."

I really have no way to wrap that one up. I guess, while names can mean something, convey a characteristic, or symbolize something, it's perfectly fine to have them be meaningless.

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Actions

A character must, obviously, stay constantly in character. By this I mean that you should make sure that if a character does something, it is befitting of him/her. It's fine for a character to do something that SEEMS out of the ordinary as long as you explain the reason for the actions.For example, if you have a character who seems to be the perfect angel, you can make him/her do something "bad" by a number of methods.

First, you could use a traumatic happening. Have a close death, or a near death experience. There's always the "hidden character" method, too. The angelic personality could be a cover-up for the character - and as the writer, you don't have to reveal this fact until you want to. Isn't that fun?

original text by Crimson Rose - amended by Clare

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Stages

A story goes through four different stages from beginning to end. These are as follows:

1, Exposition - this is where you introduce the main characters and let your readers know a bit about their background. Traits which should be revealed at this stage are:

Name
Gender
Age
Appearence
Pokemon owned, Digimon partner, house at Hogwarts or whatever (for humans)
Name of trainer (for Pokemon - optional) - if you've writing a non-Pokemon fic, you may disregard this
Unusual traits/special powers (if applicable)
Hometown

Other traits should be revealed as and when they become relevent and it's important (especially if you're writing a mystery story) not to reveal too much too soon.

2, Complication - this is where conflict arises. Note that this doesn't have to be a war in the literal sense - you can have conflict over a number of situations. In "The Chimera Children", the conflict was between two human/Ursaring hybrids and the organisation who wanted to eliminate them.

Lack of any real conflict is one of the main problems with writing journey fics. Even if you manage to avoid most of the pitfalls these stories contain (cliched starts, too little description, lack of realism etc) describing Gym battle after Gym battle can get repetitive after the first few. And, when journey fics DO contain conflict, this usually comes in the form of a rivalry between two trainers or the need to foil Team Rocket, both of which have been used in the games and tv series.

As a final note, if you're writing a short story, make the conflict something which is straightfoward and easily resolved.

3, Climax - this is it, folks! The final showdown! The conflict has reached its peak and now's the time where things could go either way. You need to build towards your climax gradually and one way to do this is by dropping subtle hints throughout your fic, a process known as foreshadowing.

Whether you include an actual battle in your climax depends on the nature of the story. You also need to be as dramatic as you can at this stage; ending your penultimate chapter with a statement like:

"Lisa and John clung to each other nervously and Growlithe snarled threateningly as the door opened"

is especially effective as it means people will need to wait until the final chapter to find out who (or what) is behind the door. You could end the story there, but, then again, finding out what's behind the door might be extremely important.

4, Resolution - here, the climax has passed and the characters are starting to get their lives back together again. Key questions should be answered at this stage if they aren't already and you might also want to drop hints that there may be a sequel.

Post-climax, your characters will more than likely be changed by their experiences and you need to reflect this in your ending. You can have them just go home and try to get on with their lives, but your plot might require that they make a new start somewhere else. But, whatever you do, don't waffle on about each character's subsequent life history unless it's absolutely essential. Even then, it might work better in a sequel.

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Other Relevent Points

Titles

Try to have at least a provisional title in mind - you can always change it later if it no longer seems to fit the story, but let your readers know if you do - as there are few things more annoying than seeing topic after topic called "Untitled Fic" or something in that vein. Titles are EXTREMELY important tools for distinguishing one story from another, which is why it's often not a good idea to have titles that are too similar to those already in use. Two particularly common examples of this are Pokemon fics with titles like "Timmy's Pokemon Journey" and Harry Potter stories where the title starts with the words "Harry Potter And The . . ."

Whatever you decide to call your fic it needs to have some relevence to the storyline, be it the name of a major character or event, a quote (an example is the novel "To Kill A Mockingbird" where the title is a metaphor for attacking the innocent) or just an appropriate word or phrase. In short, a title needs to give the reader an idea what to expect from the fic, but it should do this without giving too much information away. And do remember that there is a limit to how long topic headings can be on this board - a title like "How Lapras Trainer Josephine Court Wowed Everyone At The Pokemon League And Came Into Contact With Her Future Husband While She Was There" is going to get chopped off at the end. And it's also a little mind-boggling; as a rule, titles shouldn't contain more ideas than is absolutely necessary to convey the essence of the story's main theme. If we take an original story of mine called "The Sect Of Xanadu Peak" as an example, the title tells us that this Sect is likely to play a major role in the story. Who the Sect are, what they believe and where Xanadu Peak is located is revealed in the story itself.

And remember that the title of your fic is the first thing people are going to see. You need to grab their attention, encourage them to click on the link to your story - and the best way to do this is with a good title. That's why you need to give your fic a title, if not as soon as you start writing it, by the time the story gets under way. A lot of you probably don't remember this, but, back when this board was a UBB, there was a story in the Pokemon Fanfic section about a Ponyta who couldn't use Fire Attacks. It was untitled for the first seven or eight chapters before the author called it "The Ponyta Story" in one post and the name stuck. If you want to read it, it's on fanfiction.net . . .

Length

How long should a story be? Answer: long enough to resolve the conflict. There are no absolute rules here, but a simple plotline with a fairly straightforward conflict works best as a short story, whereas something more complex would require a multi-chaptered fic. The latter also offers scope for extensive character development that is frequently not possible in the more constrained world of short stories and you can also toss in a few relevent sub-plots if you feel you can keep track of them.

If you think a story may be nearing the end, there is a useful checklist of questions you might want to ask yourself before typing "THE END" at the bottom of the page:

1, Have I resolved the main conflict or will I do so in a sequel?
2, Have I answered key questions such as who Sue's long-lost father was?
3, If I say much more, will it descend into pointless waffle?
4, Am I ending it because the answer to the first three questions was "yes"?
5, Or am I ending it because I've got writer's block and I don't know what else to do with this story?
6, Most importantly, does the last chapter (in particular the last paragraph) give a sense of conclusion?

Indeed, the reason people find extremely short fics irritating is because there is rarely any room for conflict if the piece is too short. And I'm sure you'll agree that no conflict = bad story.

Point Of View

This means WHOSE eyes are the events in the story seen through? You're unlikely to see second person POV (You, your, yours and yourself) outside roleplay books such as "Choose Your Own Adventure" or "Fighting Fantasy", so let's skip that and concentrate on first and third person.

First person means using one of the characters to tell the story as he or she experiences it. This can give an immediate sense of how that particular person feels, but you are limited to describing things they either experience directly or learn of from another character. And, when using this perspective, remember that (as Crimson Rose said) how one character perceives something may not be how others perceive it. If we imagine two characters with widely differing views on issues such as animal rights, it's likely that each of them thinks THEY are right and the other character is wrong.

Third person means saying what the characters do by using their names and personal pronouns. There are two forms this can take:

Limited - describes events in the third person but through the eyes of a single character. If you read the "Harry Potter" books, you'll notice that everything (apart from the opening chapters of books one and four) is described from Harry's perspective. Again, as with first person POV, beware of bias.

Omnipotent - describes events through the eyes of several key characters and, as such, is useful if you want to paint a complete picture of what is happening or switch between locations. The "Redwall" books use this method so that one chapter might be set in Redwall Abbey, another in Mossflower Wood, another in Salamandastron and so on . . .

Bits And Pieces

Swearing: try to keep bad language to a minimum as excessive use of obscenities is not allowed here - and there are words that will be filtered (converted to non-alpha characters). Of course, there may well be times where your characters have to swear, but try to keep to relatively inoffensive language. If you feel someone would be likely to say something stronger, put this in indirect speech without mentioning the questionable word(s). For example, say something like "swore and cursed loudly" or "used language that would have made a sailor blush". As for using the P word to mean "angry", DON'T do it as there are plenty of inoffensive alternatives. Too much bad language is neither big nor clever and will more than likely land you with a ban.

Emoticons: as with online abbreviations such as "ppl" or "B4", try to avoid using these in the main body of your fic. They may look neat, but when was the last time you read a book that used little pictures to convey the characters' moods? Instead of saying "Anne was ", try something like "Anne was pleased/delighted/overjoyed". I'm not decrying the use of emoticons, but there is a time and a place to use them - and writing fanfics isn't either. Far better to work on describing emotions in WORDS and keep emoticons for other purposes.

Toggling: ThIs MeAnS tYpInG uPpEr AnD lOwEr CaSe AlTeRnAtElY like I just did and it's a BIG no-no. The reason for this is that toggled text is distracting and difficult to read - in other words, it can be almost as annoying as ALL CAPS! So, before you start playing around with the Shift Key or Caps Lock, remember that upper case letters should only be used if the word in question either begins a sentence or is the name of a specific person, place or event; a day of the week or month of the year; the title of a book and so on. All caps should only be used FOR EMPHASIS, but it would still be better to show this via bold or italicised text.

Crossovers: here, you need to decide which universe the fic is going to be set in and come up with a realistic (for the context) means of introducing the characters from the other fandom. I don't know about anyone else, but I dislike fanfics where characters from another series are bunged in for no real purpose. So don't have a Pokemon trainer named John who's out walking his Growlithe when he suddenly (and for reasons never explained in the story) bumps into a Digidestined girl named Toni and her Hawkmon. Instead, try to come up with an explanation for what is going on and why - you don't have to tell the reader immediately, but you darn well better do so by the end.

Knowledge: make the words "know your fandom" your fanfic-writing maxim. In my experience, it's easier to write a convincing story if you're reasonably clued up on the relevent facts. You may have your own theories about things such as how Poke Balls work or what causes kids to become Digidestined, but some knowledge of canon can come in useful even if you only use original characters.

original text by Clare

Last edited by Dirk Amoeba : 01-27-2004 at 04:28 PM. Reason: Added Clare's version instead of the one I had.
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Old 01-27-2004, 04:20 PM   #2
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Ah! THat's right, I remember now. Although I never did read it. *winces* Don't hurt me!

Since this is basically our official advice thread now (cuz it's a sticky), I'd like to add the Punctuation advice I posted in the other topic.

These punctuation rules are adapted from "The Elements of Style" by William Strunk and E.B. White. This is one of the most respected books on the subject, so this is all accurate.

1) Form the possessive singular of nouns by adding 's.


This rule is true even if the final letter is s.

Examples:

Goku's Kamehameha is a standard attack.
Pikachu's obsession with Ketchup is key in a certain episode of Pokčmon.
Miles's nickname is "Tails."

Exceptions:

The exceptions are the possessive form of ancient proper names like Moses or Jesus. But you can sometimes avoid this confusion because you would never say Moses' Law, you would say the Law of Moses.

Another exception is when saying "for righteousness' sake!" or "for conscience' sake!"

Pronouns such as his, theirs, yours, etc. have no apostrophe.

A very common error is to confuse its and it's. The first one is possessive, but the second is a contraction for "it is."

2) In a series of three or more terms with a single conjunction, use a comma after each term except the last.

Examples:

Yugi's hand included Dark Magician, Monster Reborn, and Man-Eater Bug.
Sonic raced down the corridor, collected the rings, and jumped onto the rail.
Ash had gotten Pikachu instead of Bulbasaur, Charmander, or Squirtle.

Exceptions:

The names of businesses usually leave an aditional comma out.

"After failing at pokemon theivery, the trio opened the law offices of Jessie, James & Meowth."

3) Enclose parenthetic expressions between commas.

Sometimes it is difficult to apply this rule. Think to yourself. Would this sentence still make sense wihtout it? If so, it is probably parenthetical.

Examples:

Yoh, who aspired to be the Shaman King, was glad that he had Amidamaru on his side.
Yugi wished he still had Exodia, who could instantly win the game, in his deck.
You, Link, are truly the Hero of Time reborn!

Sometimes, if sentences contain parenthetic expressions, it can be better to split them into two sentences. Follow your judgment.

4) Place a comma before a conjunction introducing an independant clause.

This means that if you combine two sentences using or, and, but, etc., then place a comma before the conjunction.

Vegeta was always strong, but Goku always seemed to be a little stronger.
The food was excellent at Redwall, and travellers came from far away to sample some.

5) Do not join independent clauses with a comma.

In other words, this:

Yusuke Urameshi ran as fast as he could, at 5:00 it would be too late.

Should be this:

Yusuke Urameshi ran as fast as he could. At 5:00 it would be too late.

Or this:

Yusuke Urameshi ran as fast as he could, because at 5:00 it would be too late.

Or even this:

Yusuke Urameshi ran as fast as he could; at 5:00 it would be too late.

6) Do not break sentences in two.

In other words, periods are not to be used as commas. So, this:

Rushing to theiir Gundams. The pilots prepared for action.

Should be this:

Rushing to theiir Gundams, the pilots prepared for action.

7) Use a colon after an independant clause to introduce a list of particulars, an appositive, an amplification, or an illustrative quotation.

Do not use a colon to separate two specifically related parts of a sentence, like a preposition ond its object or a subject and its verb.

So this:

Ash kew that a Pokemon trainer needed to consider: type advantages, moves, and weather conditions.

Should be this:

Ash kew that a Pokemon trainer needed to consider three things: type advantages, moves, and weather conditions.

8) Use a dash to set off an abrupt break or interruption and to announce a long appositive or summary.

A dash separates with more strenght than a comma, but less than a period.

Examples:

Hagrid needed rest-- a lot of rest.
Patrick's first thought-- if he was even capable of thought-- was to visit Spongebob.
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Old 02-07-2004, 08:16 AM   #3
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Some of you may have heard a little writing maxim that says "show - don't tell". What this basically means is that, instead of simply telling the reader what is happening you should try to show it via the characters' actions and reactions. For example:

Quote:
There was no-one left in the ruined city. The blackened remains of houses lined the crumbling streets and burnt-out cars cluttered the road. There were bodies everywhere and Sharon felt sick as she picked her way through the ruins, looking for other survivors.
is rather bland. But, if we put Sharon at the centre of things like so:

Quote:
Picking her way through the ruins of the city, Sharon felt physically sick at the sight of the bodies scattered everywhere as though they were litter. It was hard to believe that those blackened and tortured corpses had once been human beings with jobs, families and lives. Tears pricked at her eyes as she thought of how brutally those lives had ended and she knelt down in the middle of the crumbling street, letting the dust of the holocaust trickle through her fingers.

She gazed round at the burnt-out remains of houses. Here and there, she could see a relic of a world that was gone - the clown pattern on a child's bedroom wallpaper, someone's television set, a battered old armchair. She had not seen anyone all day; the city seemed totally devoid of life. But maybe, just maybe, there were other survivors out there - somewhere.
we get a much more vivid picture of what is happening, not least because we are now seeing it through a character's eyes and not those of a detached observer.
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Old 02-13-2004, 05:35 PM   #4
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Another thing to add on is that you shouldn't have the rules of whatever reality you are writing the story in be too complex, or too much like "unbelievable strength." For example, I think "The Dark is Rising" has to be one of the worst books ever read, and it had such a great and developable plot idea. What ruined this book is that whenever the main character was about to get killed/injured/etc., the author would make up a new rule governing what could happen in the place where the story took place. That just ruins the plot, because you can never wonder "How will 'Person X' get out of 'Situation Y'?" The author will just make something up to allow it to happen. Doing this occasionally is OK, as it actually adds to the plot, but doing so excessively will make the story lose its flavor. Take the 'Star Wars' series for example. 'The Force' and its use is governed by a series of well-established rules that are rarely bent/broken. However, sometimes places/discoveries will alter these rules. Some examples are (you may not understand what I am talking about if you don't read Star Wars much):
Aang-tii Monks (they were only touched upon briefly, but they were like an alternate form of the Jedi)
Nam Chorios (this is the planet in 'Planet of Twilight')
Yuuzhan-Vong (aliens from another galaxy that can't be sensed in the force; these are in the New Jedi Order series; this is a very good example of balancing out making up new rules, I suggest you read at least some of the books from this series as they are very good)
Ysalamiri (discussed throughout all of the books, they are surrounded by an "anti-force" bubble)
Jacen Solo (he is basically the "anti-Yuuzhan Vong"; he is one of my favorite characters)
Zonama Sekot (again, from the New Jedu Order series, as well as 'Rogue Planet.' A planet that is a jedi...hm...)

Also, you need to make sure that a character's actions fit the rules for the place where your character is. If they are in space, you need to somehow explain why they aren't dead. If they are underwater, explain how they got there and how they are breathing. Unless you want to have them do something seemingly contradictory to your dimension's rules, and then later explaining what happened, keep to the rules. It shouldn't be that hard, since you MADE UP THE RULES YOURSELF, but it adds cohesion. Here is an example of keeping to the rules, followed by an example of seemingly contradicting the rules...:

Lyn woke up. The first thing he noticed was that he was floating. Where am I? he thought.
He looked around. Below him, he saw a small red planet. He vaguely remembered it from his History classes, but couldn’t quite produce a name…
Mars. That was it. The planet was called Mars. Looking down at its desolate terrain, he wondered why early Humans had ever wanted to colonize a planet so obviously and utterly devoid of anything but an abundance of rocks and dust. It probably didn’t even have an atmosphere. But then, how was he breathing?
Then he remembered the space station. He looked around, and it was no where to be seen. What had happened to it?
“Don’t worry. Everyone else escaped. Without radiation shields, the space station overheated and evaporated.” It was Dreth’s voice. “They didn’t need to use radiation shields at first, but a terrible war caused their sun to begin releasing highly radioactive energy. This solar system is made even more barren by the fact that this radiation doesn’t penetrate through planets and does not go around them easily either. When we get to the dark side of Mars, it will be much colder. Fortunately for us, this planet has undergone little change in the past few millennia, so even outdated information on this planet will be accurate.”
“Then why are we still alive? And how did we get here from the Academy? Won’t the others worry about us?”
“It is time for them to learn the truth.”
Lyn’s eyes narrowed. He also noticed that it had been gradually becoming colder. They had begun to orbit to the dark side of Mars, out of the dangerous rays from this solar system’s sun, but also out of its warmth. Lyn remembered that it had been called the Sun, and that one of the plants had been called the Earth. It was no surprise that whatever civilization was so primitive that it lacked the creativity to even come up with proper names had died out millennia ago. “You still have not told me why we continue to live after the space station was vaporized.”
“I am drawing heat from all around us to keep us warm, and filtering out the air so that it doesn’t become stale. You are drawing radiation and anything else that might be dangerous away from us. The planet has decided to cooperate by providing us with energy.”

and then, changing (not really, just changing them in the reader's perspective) the rules...:

They hurried in, and through the tunnel. They shortly found themselves in a cave. Dreth stiffened. Lyn looked around to see what it was that had caused Dreth to do that, and then he saw what Dreth had seen…
It was a Shadow Hunter.
“You didn’t really think you could get in that easily, did you?” The Shadow Hunter’s sinister voice echoed throughout the chamber. “I’d like to thank you for coming right where I wanted you. Now you have no Academy to run back to, and thanks to the nature of this place, you won’t be able to teleport out like you seem to like to do so much.”
Suddenly the one Shadow Hunter became an army of Shadow Hunters. Lyn blinked. There were now several Dreths, too, but not nearly as many as there were Shadow Hunters. Then Lyn spied a crystal near where the original Shadow hunter had stood.
The exterior of the crystal was sardius, but within that was onyx, and then gold. Within the gold was carnelian. The entire stone seemed to contain diffused energy, and energy swirled around it like vapor. It seemed to beckon to him.

well, that's just my 2 cents, maybe you should add that. Also, an example of good description is in the last paragraph of the above example.
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Old 02-13-2004, 06:45 PM   #5
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I have something to add...your chapters shouldn't be too short, but they shouldn't be monstrously long, either. If it takes me ten minutes to scroll through it, I'm not going to read it. Break it up into two chapters; I bet more people'll read it. Just a suggestion.
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Old 02-14-2004, 04:38 PM   #6
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This isn't advice or anything, but does anyone know of any good 'Mary-Sue' tests so my characters can avoid being boring.
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Old 02-16-2004, 08:27 PM   #7
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Actually, I have written a Mary-Sue test, and it has only been applauded on many fanfic forums.

Eh- unfortunately, it's based on my own opinions, which I may very well be shunned for, and it's Pokemon-trainer specific, and many people say it's... kinda strict... ><

However... I do know of some people who did like it... but maybe they're all just dumb. x_x;;;

So if you wanna see it... jes tell me.

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Old 02-17-2004, 05:11 AM   #8
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There's a guide to writing Mary Sue tests here. You can also read the original Mary Sue test (for "Gargoyles" fanfic) on the same site.
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Old 03-12-2004, 03:31 PM   #9
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No offence but what you've written as advice I suggest editing it a little, your advice is written in such away as to say "these are how you should write, follow this like it is the bible and you are religious". Some of the rules you've stated, I agree should be followed but a good writter does not just follow everything. The best advice is to be willing to brake the rules, or else everything you produce will look like it came off a production line.

Now heres my advice:


write about what you know, the common misconception with that phrase is that you litterally write about what you know, so you write about your life. If every writer were to write about what they knew then litterature would be very boring indeed. What it atcually means is you have to know the world you creat or the places you have set your story in, you have to know how the world works, everything about your characters, even if you have no intention of putting in the backing story in the story. Knowing your character history is important in making the characters 3D, if you feel like they are real then you can write them so much better.

In hollywood thats known as a treatment, a treatment is usally about 60 pages long for a 2 hour film, but even if the films longer than that the advice given is to have it no longer than 60 pages.

In fandom it isnt just a case of knowning your fandom, if you just know your fandom and not YOUR STORY, then you'll just end up writing your favorite episode of said fandom. You need to know what your story is about, which characters it centralises on, if your introducing a new character. How the events of the story start to happen. how it leads up to the end of the story.

My tip is to write a 1 to 20 on a page and fill in the beginning and end, 1 being the begining, 20 being the end. Now you've done that, you start filling in the middle.

index cards are useful, write down as many plot events as you can think of on individual cards, then mess around with the order untill you find the best order.

There are two forms of writing narative, suspense or mystery, dont let anyone tell you any different. suspense is wondering what will happen next and mystery is looking back into the past for answers. every film and every book (apart from text books) fall into one of these two catergorys.

your story has to have conflict, if it doesnt have conflict then it isnt worth reading, you need a reason for your characters to go off on an adventure, on this adventure they will run into trouble, they will come to a point where it can not get any worse, then they have to find a way back from this problem.

Ultimatly your characters need to grow and change and become different people.

If your writing a jerk in your film and he is not the protagonist, do not appolgise for why he is a jerk, dont create a back story that gives reasons for him acting like that, some people are just jerks.
----------------------------

Its hard to give just one set of advice because there are so many rules and so many loop holes, My advice is do do alot of reading about writing, Now that wont make you a good writer but having a sizeable knowlage on writing is very useful.


http://screenwriting.ugo.com/screen...monmistakes.php

the above article is very good and I highly recomend you read that, its very, very good advice on writing.

http://screenwriting.ugo.com/vbulle...hp?threadid=163

http://www.scriptwritingsecrets.com/contents.htm

http://www.breakingin.net/

http://www.screenwriter.com/

http://www.scriptwritingsecrets.com/contents.htm

http://www.wordplayer.com/siteinfo/sitemap.html

http://www.screenwritersutopia.com/

http://www.moviebytes.com/

http://www.oscars.org/nicholl/faqs.html

http://www.wga.org/mentors/index.html

http://filmmaker.com/

http://www.hollywoodlitsales.com/

http://www.screenplay.com/sitemap/index.html

I'd start with those but ultimately just have fun.

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edit:

just found a great article for writing for fan fics:

"Seven Steps To A Successful Spec Script
by Aury Wallington ~ Aury is the script coordinator for Sex and the City.

It’s easy to learn the format of writing for television from a book or writing class. It’s a much harder thing to capture the voice and the tone of a particular series, Use this exercise to learn what makes your favorite TV series work, then craft a spec script that showcases your writing talent.

and to make your script fit flawlessly into the run of the show. Television is the one medium where you don’t want your own unique voice to shine through. The characters’ voices and thoughts and ideas need to stay true to the ones already established by the series’ creators. Here’s an exercise to help you capture the established voice of the show you wish to write.

Videotape a new episode of a show you love and that you watch often. Watch the first half, then shut off the television You are going to write the ending yourself.

Start by brainstorming all the possible ways the episode could end. For example, on the show I work on Sex and the City, in the first half of the episode “Ghost Town,” Carrie and Miranda learn that Steve and Aidan are opening a bar together. At the halfway point, Carrie has just run out of the bar after hearing Aidan’s voice because she is afraid to face him again. Think up as many ideas as you can for ways to resolve this story. Carrie could see Aidan and discover that he’s married to someone else. She could realize she never loved him. Or maybe she realizes that she loves him still. Maybe she never sees him at all-she goes back to the bar only to discover he’s left New York for good. There are dozens of possible resolutions-let your imagination run wild... http://www.pilotproject.tv/7_steps_spec_script.html"

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Old 03-16-2004, 05:49 AM   #10
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As far as planning stories goes, my advice would be to do this by all means, but don't be too rigid about it. I'm sure you've all had times where you thought of what seemed like a good idea for your story, but, when you actually came to write it, you went: "Argh! What was I thinking?!" If an idea which seemed good at the planning stage doesn't really work in the actual story, don't be afraid to scrap or rewrite it. But, at the same time, try not to lose track of your original scenario.

And, regarding writing about what you know, I agree that this is some advice you shouldn't follow too rigidly - if everyone only "wrote about what they knew", there would be no fantasy, no science fiction . . . in fact, nothing that wasn't directly related to the author's personal experiences. Someone (I can't remember who) suggested that the advice should be "write about what you know and, if you don't know, find out". What this means is doing research, checking your facts. With fanfiction, this means details such as the fact that Pokemon trainers are only allowed to carry up to six Pokemon at a time; with original fiction, things like historical accuracy come to the forefront. In fantasy and science fiction, you can of course invent your own rules for the society you portray, but try to keep it consistent.

If you write fanfiction, try asking yourself if the storyline you're writing fits in with the series - that's what I meant by "knowing your fandom". Could such a thing conceivably happen in the universe of the series? Even Alternate Universe fics (where the author deliberately deviates from canon) require some knowledge of canon in order to imagine what might happen if the characters' situations were different. Basically, you can't deliberately break the rules unless you know the rules.
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Old 04-03-2004, 12:20 AM   #11
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Oh, and one more thing . . .

Don't mess around changing text colours!

The reason I say this is because too many garish colours can distract the reader and make reading the fic a chore rather than a pleasure. I've just taken someone to task for doing exactly what I'm talking about. So stick to the default text colour unless you have a good reason to use another. And excuses like "it's so I can tell who's talking" are NOT a good reason. We show who's talking via quotation marks, words like "said" and descriptions of what the character is doing while he or she speaks.
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Old 04-22-2004, 01:31 AM   #12
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Default And now I give you The Thirty-six Dramatic Situations 1 - 12

As a not to confuse this was written Georges Polti, He did extensive research into litterature and found that there were 36 dramatic situations, these are every single situation you will ever find in story writing which just proves that there arnt any orriginal idea's left just orriginal takes on them. It should be useful for getting idea's to a story or just figureing out where to place the one you've written.

01. SUPPLICATION
(The dynamic elements technically necessary are: a Persecutor; a Suppliant; and a Power in authority, whose decision is doubtful)
A.
(1) Fugitives Imploring the Powerful for Help Against Their Enemies
(2) Assistance Implored for the Performance of a Pious Duty Which Has Been Forbidden
(3) Appeals for a Refuge in Which to Die
B.
(1) Hospitality Besought by the Shipwrecked
(2) Charity Entreated by Those Cast Off by Their Own People, Whom They Have Disgraced
(3) Expiation: The Seeking of Pardon, Healing or Deliverance
(4) The Surrender of a Corpse, or of a Relic, Solicited
C.
(1) Supplication of the Powerful for Those Dear to the Suppliant
(2) Supplication to a Relative in Behalf of Another Relative
(3) Supplication to a Mother's Lover, in Her Behalf



02. DELIVERANCE
(Elements: an Unfortunate, a Threatener, a Rescuer)
A.
(1) Appearance of a Rescuer to the Condemned
B.
(1) A Parent Replaced Upon a Throne by His Children
(2) Rescue by Friends, or by Strangers Grateful for Benefits Or Hospitality



03. CRIME Pursued by Vengeance
(Elements: an Avenger and a Criminal)
A.
(1) The Avenging of a Slain Parent or Ancestor
(2) The Avenging of a Slain Child or Descendant
(3) Vengeance for a Child Dishonored
(4) The Avenging of a Slain Wife or Husband
(5) Vengeance for the Dishonor, or Attempted Dishonoring, of a Wife
(6) Vengeance for a Mistress Slain
(7) Vengeance for a Slain or Injured Friend
(8) Vengeance for a Sister Seduced
B.
(1) Vengeance for Intentional Injury or Spoliation
(2) Vengeance for Having Been Despoiled During Absence
(3) Revenge for an Attempted Slaying
(4) Revenge for a False Accusation
(5) Vengeance for Violation
(6) Vengeance for Having Been Robbed of One's Own
(7) Revenge Upon a Whole Sex for a Deception by One
C.
(1) Professional Pursuit of Criminals



04. VENGEANCE Taken For Kindred Upon Kindred
(Elements: Avenging Kinsman; Guilty Kinsman; Remembrance of the Victim, a Relative of Both)
A.
(1) A Father's Death Avenged Upon a Mother
(2) A Mother's Death Avenged Upon a Father
B.
(1) A Brother's Death Avenged Upon a Son
C.
(1) A Father's Death Avenged Upon a Husband
D.
(1) A Husband's Death Avenged Upon a Father



05. PURSUIT
(Elements: Punishment and Fugitive)
A.
(1) Fugitives from Justice Pursued for Brigandage, Political Offenses, Etc.
B.
(1) Pursued for a Fault of Love
C.
(1) A Hero Struggling Against a Power
D.
(1) A Pseudo-Madman Struggling Against an Iago-Like Alienist



06. DISASTER
(Elements: a Vanquished Power; a Victorious Enemy or a Messenger)
A.
(1) Defeat Suffered
(2) A Fatherland Destroyed
(3) The Fall of Humanity
(4) A Natural Catastrophe
B.
(1) A Monarch Overthrown
C.
(1) Ingratitude Suffered
(2) The Suffering of Unjust Punishment or Enmity
(3) An Outrage Suffered
D.
(1) Abandonment by a Lover or a Husband
(2) Children Lost by Their Parents



07. FALLING PREY To Cruelty Or Misfortune
(Elements: an Unfortunate; a Master or a Misfortune)
A.
(1) The Innocent Made the Victim of Ambitious Intrigue
B.
(1) The Innocent Despoiled by Those Who Should Protect
C.
(1) The Powerful Dispossessed and Wretched
(2) A Favorite or an Intimate Finds Himself Forgotten
D.
(1) The Unfortunate Robbed of Their Only Hope



08. REVOLT
(Elements: Tyrant and Conspirator)
A.
(1) A Conspiracy Chiefly of One Individual
(2) A Conspiracy of Several
B.
(1) Revolt of One Individual, Who Influences and Involves Others
(2) A Revolt of Many



09. DARING Enterprise
(Elements: a Bold Leader; an Object; an Adversary)
A.
(1) Preparations For War
B.
(1) War
(2) A Combat
C.
(1) Carrying Off a Desired Person or Object
(2) Recapture of a Desired Object
D.
(1) Adventurous Expeditions
(2) Adventure Undertaken for the Purpose of Obtaining a Beloved Woman



10. ABDUCTION
(Elements: the Abductor; the Abducted; the Guardian)
A.
(1) Abduction of an Unwilling Woman
B.
(1) Abduction of a Consenting Woman
C.
(1) Recapture of the Woman Without the Slaying of the Abductor
(2) The Same Case, with the Slaying of the Ravisher
D.
(1) Rescue of a Captive Friend
(2) Of a Child
(3) Of a Soul in Captivity to Error



11. THE ENIGMA
(Elements: Interrogator, Seeker and Problem)
A.
(1) Search for a Person Who Must Be Found on Pain of Death
B.
(1) A Riddle To Be Solved on Pain of Death
(2) The Same Case, in Which the Riddle is Proposed by the Coveted Woman
C.
(1) Temptations Offered With the Object of Discovering His Name
(2) Temptations Offered With the Object of Ascertaining the Sex
(3) Tests for the Purpose of Ascertaining the Mental Condition



12. OBTAINING
(Elements: a Solicitor and an Adversary Who is Refusing, or an Arbitrator and Opposing Parties)
A.
(1) Efforts to Obtain an Object by Ruse or Force
B.
(1) Endeavor by Means of Persuasive Eloquence Alone
C.
(1) Eloquence With an Arbitrator

Last edited by willis : 04-22-2004 at 01:37 AM.
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Old 04-22-2004, 01:33 AM   #13
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Default 13 - 24

13. ENMITY Of Kinsmen
(Elements: a Malevolent Kinsman; a Hatred or Reciprocally Hating Kinsman)
A.
(1) Hatred of Brothers -- One Brother Hated by Several
(2) Reciprocal Hatred
(3) Hatred Between Relatives for Reasons of Self-Interest
B.
(1) Hatred of Father and Son -- Of the Son for the Father
(2) Mutual Hatred
(3) Hatred of Daughter for Father
C.
(1) Hatred of Grandfather for Grandson
D.
(1) Hatred of Father-in-law for Son-in-law
E.
(1) Hatred of Mother-in-law for Daughter-in-law
F.
(1) Infanticide



14. RIVALRY Of Kinsmen
(Elements: the Preferred Kinsman; the Rejected Kinsman; the Object)
A.
(1) Malicious Rivalry of a Brother
(2) Malicious Rivalry of Two Brothers
(3) Rivalry of Two Brothers, With Adultery on the Part of One
(4) Rivalry of Sisters
B.
(1) Rivalry of Father and Son, for an Unmarried Woman
(2) Rivalry of Father and Son, for a Married Woman
(3) Case Similar to the Two Foregoing, But in Which the Object is Already the Wife of the Father
(4) Rivalry of Mother and Daughter
C.
(1) Rivalry of Cousins
D.
(1) Rivalry of Friends



15. MURDEROUS Adultery
(Elements: Two Adulterers; a Betrayed Husband or Wife)
A.
(1) The Slaying of a Husband by, or for, a Paramour
(2) The Slaying of a Trusting Lover
B.
(1) Slaying of a Wife for a Paramour, and in Self-Interest



16. MADNESS
(Elements: Madman and Victim)
A.
(1) Kinsmen Slain in Madness
(2) Lover Slain in Madness
(3) Slaying or Injuring of a Person not Hated
B.
(1) Disgrace Brought Upon Oneself Through Madness
C.
(1) Loss of Loved Ones Brought About by Madness
D.
(1) Madness Brought on by Fear of Hereditary Insanity



17. FATAL Imprudence
(Elements: The Imprudent; the Victim or the Object Lost)
A.
(1) Imprudence the Cause of One's Own Misfortune
(2) Imprudence the Cause of One's Own Dishonor
B.
(1) Curiosity the Cause of One's Own Misfortune
(2) Loss of the Possession of a Loved One, Through Curiosity
C.
(1) Curiosity the Cause of Death or Misfortune to Others
(2) Imprudence the Cause of a Relative's Death
(3) Imprudence the Cause of a Lover's Death
(4) Credulity the Cause of Kinsmen's Deaths



18. INVOLUNTARY Crimes Of Love
(Elements: the Lover, the Beloved; the Revealer)
A.
(1) Discovery that One Has Married One's Mother
(2) Discovery that One Has Had a Sister as Mistress
B.
(1) Discovery that One Has Married One's Sister
(2) The Same Case, in Which the Crime Has Been Villainously Planned by a Third Person
(3) Being Upon the Point of Taking a Sister, Unknowingly, as Mistress
C.
(1) Being Upon the Point of Violating, Unknowingly, a Daughter
D.
(1) Being Upon the Point of Committing an Adultery Unknowingly
(2) Adultery Committed Unknowingly



19. SLAYING of a Kinsman Unrecognized
(Elements: the Slayer, the Unrecognized Victim)
A.
(1) Being Upon the Point of Slaying a Daughter Unknowingly, by Command of a Divinity or an Oracle
(2) Through Political Necessity
(3) Through a Rivalry in Love
(4) Through Hatred of the Lover of the Unrecognized Daughter
B.
(1) Being Upon the Point of Killing a Son Unknowingly
(2) The Same Case, Strengthened by Machiavellian Instigations
C.
(1) Being Upon the Point of Slaying a Brother Unknowingly
D.
(1) Slaying of a Mother Unrecognized
E.
(1) A Father Slain Unknowingly, Through Machiavellian Advice
F.
(1) A Grandfather Slain Unknowingly, in Vengeance and Through Instigation
G.
(1) Involuntary Killing of a Loved Woman
(2) Being Upon the Point of Killing a Lover Unrecognized
(3) Failure to Rescue an Unrecognized Son



20. SELF-Sacrificing For An Ideal
(Elements: the Hero; the Ideal; the 'Creditor' or the Person or Thing Sacrificed)
A.
(1) Sacrifice of Life for the Sake of One's Word
(2) Life Sacrifice for the Success of One's People
(3) Life Sacrificed in Filial Piety
(4) Life Sacrificed for the Sake of One's Faith
B.
(1) Both Love and Life Sacrificed for One's Faith, or a Cause
(2) Love Sacrificed to the Interests of State
C.
(1) Sacrifice of Well-Being to Duty
D.
(1) The Ideal of 'Honor' Sacrificed to the Ideal of 'Faith'



21. SELF-Sacrifice For Kindred
(Elements: the Hero; the Kinsman; the 'Creditor' or the Person or Thing Sacrificed)
A.
(1) Life Sacrificed for that of a Relative or a Loved One
(2) Life Sacrificed for the Happiness of a Relative or a Loved One
B.
(1) Ambition Sacrificed for the Happiness of a Parent
(2) Ambition Sacrificed for the Life of a Parent
C.
(1) Love Sacrificed for the Sake of a Parent's Life
(2) For the Happiness of One's Child
(3) The Same Sacrifice as 2, But Caused by Unjust Laws
D.
(1) Life and Honor Sacrificed for the Life of a Parent or Loved One
(2) Modesty Sacrificed for the Life of a Relative or a Loved One



22. ALL Sacrificed For A Passion
(Elements: the Lover, the Object of the Fatal Passion; the Person or Thing Sacrificed)
A.
(1) Religious Vows of Chastity Broken for a Passion
(2) Respect for a Priest Destroyed
(3) A Future Ruined by Passion
(4) Power Ruined by Passion
(5) Ruin of Mind, Health, and Life
(6) Ruin of Fortunes, Lives, and Honors
B.
(1) Temptations Destroying the Sense of Duty, of Piety, etc.
C.
(1) Destruction of Honor, Fortune, and Life by Erotic Vice
(2) The Same Effect Produced by Any Other Vice



23. NECESSITY Of Sacrificing Love Ones
(Elements: the Hero; the Beloved Victim; the Necessity for the Sacrifice)
A.
(1) Necessity for Sacrificing a Daughter in the Public Interest
(2) Duty of Sacrificing Her in Fulfillment of a Vow to God
(3) Duty of Sacrificing Benefactors or Loved Ones to One's Faith
B.
(1) Duty of Sacrificing One's Child, Unknown to Others, Under the Pressure of Necessity
(2) Duty of Sacrificing, Under the Same Circumstances, One's Father or Husband
(3) Duty of Sacrificing a Son-in-law for the Public Good
(4) Duty of Contending with a Brother-in-Law for the Public Good
(5) Duty of Contending with a Friend



24. RIVALRY Of Superior And Inferior
(Elements: the Superior Rival; the Inferior Rival; the Object)
A.
(1) Masculine Rivalries; of a Mortal and an Immortal
(2) Of a Magician and an Ordinary Man
(3) Of Conqueror and Conquered
(4) Of a King and a Noble
(5) Of a Powerful Person and an Upstart
(6) Of Rich and Poor
(7) Of an Honored Man and a Suspected One
(8) Rivalry of Two Who are Almost Equal
(9) Of the Two Successive Husbands of a Divorcee
B.
(1) Feminine Rivalries; Of a Sorceress and an Ordinary Woman
(2) Of Victor and Prisoner
(3) Of Queen and Subject
(4) Of Lady and Servant
(5) Rivalry Between Memory or an Ideal (That of a Superior Woman) and a Vassal of Her Own
C.
(1) Double Rivalry (A loves B, who loves C, who loves D)
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Old 04-22-2004, 01:34 AM   #14
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Default 25 - 36

25. ADULTERY
(Elements: a Deceived Husband or Wife; Two Adulterers)
A.
(1) A Mistress Betrayed, For a Young Woman
(2) For a Young Wife
B.
(1) A Wife Betrayed, For a Slave Who Does Not Love in Return
(2) For Debauchery
(3) For a Married Woman
(4) With the Intention of Bigamy
(5) For a Young Girl, who Does Not Love in Return
(6) A Wife Envied by a Young Girl Who is in Love With Her Husband
(7) By a Courtesan
C.
(1) An Antagonistic Husband Sacrificed for a Congenial Lover
(2) A Husband, Believed to be Lost, Forgotten for a Rival
(3) A Commonplace Husband Sacrificed for a Sympathetic Lover
(4) A Good Husband Betrayed for an Inferior Rival
(5) For a Grotesque Rival
(6) For a Commonplace Rival, By a Perverse Wife
(7) For a Rival Less Handsome, But Useful
D.
(1) Vengeance of a Deceived Husband
(2) Jealousy Sacrificed for the Sake of a Cause
(3) Husband Persecuted by a Rejected Rival



26. CRIMES Of Love
(Elements: The Lover, the Beloved)
A.
(1) A Mother in Love with Her Son
(2) A Daughter in Love with her Father
(3) Violation of a Daughter by a Father
B.
(1) A Woman Enamored of Her Stepson
(2) A Woman and Her Stepson Enamored of Each Other
(3) A Woman Being the Mistress, at the Same Time, of a Father and Son, Both of Whom Accept the Situation
C.
(1) A Man Becomes the Lover of his Sister-in-Law
(2) A Brother and Sister in Love with Each Other
D.
(1) A Man Enamored of Another Man, Who Yields
E.
(1) A Woman Enamored of a Beast



27. DISCOVERY Of The Dishonor Of A Loved One
(Elements: the Discoverer; the Guilty One)
A.
(1) Discovery of a Mother's Shame
(2) Discovery of a Father's Shame
(3) Discovery of a Daughter's Dishonor
B.
(1) Discovery of Dishonor in the Family of One's Fiancee
(2) Discovery than One's Wife Has Been Violated Before Marriage, Or Since the Marriage
(3) That She Has Previously Committed a Fault
(4) Discovery that One's Wife Has Formerly Been a Prostitute
(5) Discovery that One's Mistress, Formerly a Prostitute, Has Returned to Her Old Life
(6) Discovery that One's Lover is a Scoundrel, or that One's Mistress is a Woman of Bad Character
(7) The Same Discovery Concerning One's Wife
C.
(1) Duty of Punishing a Son Who is a Traitor to Country
(2) Duty of Punishing a Son Condemned Under a Law Which the Father Has Made
(3) Duty of Punishing One's Mother to Avenge One's Father



28. OBSTACLES To Love
(Elements: Two Lovers, an Obstacle)
A.
(1) Marriage Prevented by Inequality of Rank
(2) Inequality of Fortune an Impediment to Marriage
B.
(1) Marriage Prevented by Enemies and Contingent Obstacles
C.
(1) Marriage Forbidden on Account of the Young Woman's Previous Betrothal to Another
D.
(1) A Free Union Impeded by the Opposition of Relatives
E.
(1) By the Incompatibility of Temper of the Lovers



29. AN ENEMY Loved
(Elements: The Beloved Enemy; the Lover; the Hater)
A.
(1) The Loved One Hated by Kinsmen of the Lover
(2) The Lover Pursued by the Brothers of His Beloved
(3) The Lover Hated by the Family of His Beloved
(4) The Beloved is an Enemy of the Party of the Woman Who Loves Him
B.
(1) The Beloved is the Slayer of a Kinsman of the Woman Who Loves Him



30. AMBITION
(Elements: an Ambitious Person; a Thing Coveted; an Adversary)
A.
(1) Ambition Watched and Guarded Against by a Kinsman, or By a Person Under Obligation
B.
(1) Rebellious Ambition
C.
(1) Ambition and Covetousness Heaping Crime Upon Crime



31. CONFLICT With A God
(Elements: a Mortal, an Immortal)
A.
(1) Struggle Against a Deity
(2) Strife with the Believers in a God
B.
(1) Controversy with a Deity
(2) Punishment for Contempt of a God
(3) Punishment for Pride Before a God



32. MISTAKEN Jealousy
(Elements: the Jealous One; the Object of Whose Possession He is Jealous; the Supposed Accomplice; the Cause or the Author of the Mistake)
A.
(1) The Mistake Originates in the Suspicious Mind of the Jealous One
(2) Mistaken Jealousy Aroused by Fatal Chance
(3) Mistaken Jealousy of a Love Which is Purely Platonic
(4) Baseless Jealousy Aroused by Malicious Rumors
B.
(1) Jealousy Suggested by a Traitor Who is Moved by Hatred, or Self-Interest
C.
(1) Reciprocal Jealousy Suggested to Husband and Wife by a Rival



33. ERRONEOUS Judgment
(Elements: The Mistaken One; the Victim of the Mistake; the Cause or Author of the Mistake; the Guilty Person)
A.
(1) False Suspicion Where Faith is Necessary
(2) False Suspicion of a Mistress
(3) False Suspicion Aroused by a Misunderstood Attitude of a Loved One
B.
(1) False Suspicions Drawn Upon Oneself to Save a Friend
(2) They Fall Upon the Innocent
(3) The Same Case as 2, but in Which the Innocent had a Guilty Intention, or Believes Himself Guilty
(4) A Witness to the Crime, in the Interest of a Loved One, Lets Accusation Fall Upon the Innocent
C.
(1) The Accusation is Allowed to Fall Upon an Enemy
(2) The Error is Provoked by an Enemy
D.
(1) False Suspicion Thrown by the Real Culprit Upon One of His Enemies
(2) Thrown by the Real Culprit Upon the Second Victim Against Whom He Has Plotted From the Beginning



34. REMORSE
(Elements: the Culprit; the Victim or the Sin; the Interrogator)
A.
(1) Remorse for an Unknown Crime
(2) Remorse for a Parricide
(3) Remorse for an Assassination
B.
(1) Remorse for a Fault of Love
(2) Remorse for an Adultery



35. RECOVERY Of A Lost One
(The Seeker; the One Found)
A.
(1) A Child Stolen
B.
(1) Unjust Imprisonment
C.
(1) A Child Searches to Discover His Father



36. LOSS Of Loved Ones
(A Kinsman Slain; a Kinsman Spectator; an Executioner)
A.
(1) Witnessing the Slaying of Kinsmen While Powerless to Prevent It
(2) Helping to Bring Misfortune Upon One's People Through Professional Secrecy
B.
(1) Divining the Death of a Loved One
C.
(1) Learning of the Death of a Kinsman or Ally, and Lapsing into Despair
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Old 05-05-2004, 06:43 AM   #15
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And what was the point of that comment?

Returning to the subject of advice, I would like to point out that the Mary Sues mentioned earlier are not necessarily bad by definition. What is bad is the way these characters hog all the action and keep outclassing the canon characters. They are quite easy to spot. Often, they will have the same name (real name or screen name) as their creator; in addition, they will share at least some of their creator's interests. They may also have extraordinary powers which they wind up using to save the day - the character may also die (or come close to dying) at this point. If the character is killed, the canon characters will go into mourning and the character will then be revived. Often, the character will become romantically involved with a canon character, possibly causing a certain amount of bitterness and resentment on the part of at least one other canon character.

Other typical Mary Sue traits include being related to a canon character and something nasty having happened to the character, usually during childhood or adolescence. In any case, if you find yourself with such a character, you might want to consider toning him or her down a little. Here are a few tips:

1, Give the character at least one fault. Not being able to sing doesn't count here. What does count are things like being a Pokemon who can't use the Attacks it should be able to use - like the Ponyta featured in "The Ponyta Story", although she does discover that she CAN use the Attacks of another Pokemon Type - or having a tendency to act without thinking.

2, If the character MUST have special powers, try to be reasonable about them. If there's a magic user (or similar) in your story, don't have him or her use his or her powers for every little thing. Indeed, most fantasy books (such as "Harry Potter") impose certain restrictions on what magic can and can't do. And (especially if the character isn't of a race that normally has magical powers) try to come up with a reasonable explanation for the presence of these powers.

3, Don't let the character do everything perfectly the first time he or she does it. For example, a "Pokemon" fic called "Wings Of Hope" features a girl who has wings hidden in her back but, because of her father's attitude to people like her, has never spread them. When she finally does spread them, instead of having it happen without any hitches, the author describe how she has difficulties doing so; the same thing applies when she tries to learn to fly.

4, Don't let the character "save the day" all the time. Sometimes is perfectly fine, but do think about letting the canon characters handle things from time to time. And, even if your story doesn't revolve around your character "saving the day", try not to let him or her win everything. For example, if you're writing a "Yu-Gi-Oh" fic, let the character lose at least a few duels. He or she won't suffer for not winning all the time and will be more believable as a result.

5, Try asking yourself if you really need to have this character in your fic. If you take him or her out of the picture and the story still reads well, he or she is probably surplus to requirements. But, if the story doesn't seem to work without the character, consider the notes I've written above and read Crimson Rose's notes in this thread's first post.

And remember that not every Mary Sue is the character from Hell. The main character in "Wings Of Hope" often strikes me as being something of a Mary Sue, but the story itself was very popular in its day and it's written well enough that having such a character in it doesn't really detract from the plot.

Well, that's my 100th post on this board used up.
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Old 08-25-2004, 09:22 AM   #16
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A couple of other things you might want to think twice about using:

1, Tautology: This means using two words (or phrases) that mean more or less exactly the same thing. Examples include:

A dangerous hazard - use either "a danger" or "a hazard"

An assortment of various things - use either "an assortment of things" or "a variety of things"

The reason tautology should be avoided is because all you're really doing is repeating what you just said with different words. This does not add anything to the story except several unnecessary words.

2, Random Japanese: Some anime fans seem to think that slipping Japanese words into their fanfics makes them "cool". Not so. Imagine, for example, that someone is writing a "Pokemon" fanfic and their main character has a Skitty. They could write:

Quote:
My little Skitty was so kawaii.
But there are plenty of perfectly good English words they could use instead - cute, adorable, pretty, sweet to name a few off the top of my head. As a rule, try to avoid using foreign words unless:

A, There is no English word that has quite the correct meaning

B, The word in question is so commonly used in English that it has become intergrated into the language
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Old 09-20-2004, 12:37 PM   #17
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I'd like to dicuss something that hasnt atcually been mentioned in the topic, we've talked alot about structure and advice for getting inspiration but what we havent really talked about is passion.

Passion is the most important part of an art work because with out it, its nothing, its dull its lifeless and thats even if you get it finished.

Passion is not only passion for writing in this case but it is also passion for the subject matter, that might be anger and hatred, it might be love, it might just be creating something really cool but you have to have passion for it all the way through.

Hitlers paintings are a great example, hitler's work had all the classical training down very well, but it lacked passion or even best described as it lacked feeling. If you dont put feeling into a peice of art work then how do you expect to get a feeling out of the audiance as you will.

This applys to all art, dancing, music, writing and paintings.
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Old 09-22-2004, 09:23 AM   #18
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I definitely agree with that. You could have everything technically correct, but if you don't want to write the story, or you don't have the right feel or mood for it, then it just won't work. Which is why I don't force myself to write if I have writer's block... you should just let the ideas come when they come.
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Old 11-27-2004, 11:18 AM   #19
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Woah! You talk..er..write too much. Luckiliy I'm here to give way better advice!

1) Make sure the actual story has a plot!
2) Make all facts clear or there can be mass confusion.
3) Never use your real name when publishing. VERY BAD NO-NO!
4) Don't forget to feature the new characters at the appropriate time.
5) Use excruciating details in your...uh...book, novela, whatever!
6) HIRE AN EDITOR! You need one more than you bad spellers think!
7) Make the paragraphs flow. It helps divide ideas better.
8) Use active writing to express opinions or emotions in the story.
9) Make sure the genre of your story is absolutely clear as a bell!
10) USE ORIGINAL IDEAS! Don't copy others. You can get arrested!

Hope this helps to all you novice writers out there!
PM me if you need more info.
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Old 12-02-2004, 08:11 AM   #20
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Kingzorc2, what was the point of that comment?

Anyway, here's a few hints regarding what you should do if you get criticised:

First of all, I try to draw a distinction between a constructive critic and a flamer. A constructive critic is someone who wants to help people improve their writing, whereas a flamer is someone who (often because they have no writing talent themselves) goes round insulting authors and telling them their work "sucks" without explaining why. The best thing to do if you run into someone like this is to report them (use the Report Bad Post link) and let the mods deal with it.

But, when it comes to constructive critics, don't get angry with them and start whining about how they are "insulting your hard work". Instead, you should at least try to realise that all they are doing is offering pointers on where you're going wrong. It can be hard to see your own work from another person's point of view, but do at least consider why they said what they said. For example, you might have an excellent idea for a story, but your spelling, punctuation and grammar has let you down - so try working on that side of your writing. I know it's not very exciting, but, unless people can actually make sense of your story, the best plot in the world won't help you.
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Old 02-08-2005, 04:48 PM   #21
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Default What about reading?

There has been a lot said about writing, but one thing crucial that's missing, in my opinion....

Reading.

I think that reading a lot (dorky as it may sound) is one of the best and most entertaining things out there, and as a bonus, it improves your writing. A 'learn by example' sort of thing. I'm not saying copy other people's work; quite the opposite. When you read, you have an idea of what's out there, what's interesting to readers, and what there needs to be. Lets say you've read a lot of books, and none on a certain subject that you love. Either you're not looking hard enough...or you should take action and write about that.

Also, reading a lot lets you see what styles you like, and what's effective. You could write like Hemmingway if that's all you knew, but then you'd sound like Hemmingway and your work would be a little hard to read. Get a broad base and you can look at other styles, combine them, and come up with something that's all your own.

Just some more general advice: there should be a topic where you can critique writing. It would have to be modded for flaming...but I think it would be very useful.
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Old 02-09-2005, 05:54 PM   #22
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I agree with that. I often read the Tamora Pierce books, over and over, to get ideas on how I want my fantasy writing to be, but still other readings are more exposure to other things. (Plus I really love those books anyway)

I think another way to write better is with role playing. This could be with DnD, acting, message boards, anything that gives you a chance to really become your characters. I personally find DnD and message board RPGs to be useful in really interacting with other people, characters you might not have thought about or really be willing to play yourself, and, with message boards, see other people's styles of writing and be able to look back at it. I don't really like IM rping, since it's too brief, barely writing, and typically unsaveable, and it has the possiblities of random interuptions. Writing needs to be a bit more in depth. But overall, I've noticed that my writing has improved with RPing, and even if I can't work on whatever story at that time, at least my general writing skill isn't that bad.
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Old 03-03-2005, 10:01 AM   #23
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I thought it might be an idea to have a few hints on how to write reviews.

When writing a review, try to avoid praising everything regardless of quality. For example, someone might have come up with an excellent idea for a story; unfortunately, the fic is riddled with typos and contains several glaring grammatical errors. You could review it with the words:

Quote:
Wow! That was soooooooo cool! 10/10!
But this wouldn't tell the author anything about what they need to fix. I don't mind people leaving reviews like the above example in fics that deserve them, but do try to avoid raving on about how "cool" fics are at the expense of critiquing any errors. By all means leave a positive review for a well-written fic - just don't be afraid to point out anything that needs improving. Our hypothetical fic might be better reviewed like this:

Quote:
You've got some good ideas. However, I would suggest you work on your grammar and try proof-reading your work before you post.
Also, try to avoid saying negative things about a story without explaining why you're making the criticisms - otherwise, it can sound as though you are criticising it just because YOU don't like it. Let's imagine, for instance, that someone has written a "Yu-Gi-Oh!" fic, which contains several errors because that author is new to the fandom and isn't very familiar with how the series works (NOTE: this fic is not intended to be AU). A review like this:

Quote:
Dude, you suck! This is NOT what would happen in the series, so shove off and NEVER WRITE AGAIN!
would amount to bashing because, while the fic probably does need to be criticised, it does not explain where the author is going wrong. If, however, someone gently but firmly pointed out that the story contradicted the tv series by, for example, assigning the wrong Millennium Items to the wrong characters, that would be constructive criticism. Among other things, it would give the author chance to correct the mistakes - or at least explain them if they were deliberate.

And one thing you DEFINITELY shouldn't do is threaten authors whose work you don't like; instead, stay out of their topics. Also, don't give a fic a bad review just to get back at the author for "insulting" your work.
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Old 05-17-2005, 01:06 PM   #24
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Man, have I not been on the board in a while.

Okay: so you want to write a fanfic. First of all, know your fandom. Know what the characters are like, and how the whole 'system' of the original works. That way, you can use it effectively.

Read that first post; the whole long list of writing basics. Follow those. They're very important. Say that you want to write a humor fic - you still have to take them into account. There are all kinds of 'funny' or 'humorous' fanfiction that is poorly written, stupid, and riddled with typos. If you take your time and work on it, make it like real writing, it'll be funnier.

Do you have any previous writing experience ? Your post seems to be surprisingly good as far as grammar, spelling, and common sense goes. If you have experience, use it: but don't give too long an intro like you might in something original. The fans already know the characters and the situations.

If you want to write something that happens at a particular point, don't say it outright (either in your story or the description, and only if you really have to do it in your description), insinuate it in the story. Have someone say "Remember when..." or put what happened in context - your story starts after a major fight, say.
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Old 05-03-2006, 05:10 PM   #25
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Ah well done! If I may, I would like to add something else.

If you are writing a fan fic that's set in a certain time period then the best thing to do is do a little research. Excuses like I can't go to the Library, I don't know any of that crap cuz I wasn't born back then, will NOT do.
There are a number of sites on the net that can help you.

Here are things that you need to look up.
Each time period and region has thier own style.
Language and speech patterns.= Each region has thier own dilect and accent.
Fashion= People have different styles for weather, social status, and work ect.

Dance= Like tribal dances, cerimonial dances, social dances.
Music= Style and instruments
Food= Are they vegitarian or not? Tribal dishes
Architecture and furniture= Roman Greek or Japanese?
Religious, marital and social customs. Not every bride wears a white dress ya know. In some cultures women where and still are treated like 2nd class citizens.
Currency= Money or trade goods?
Slavery= I don't need to explain that one.
Education
Medicine
Technology
Sports and past times
Warfare
Politics and government.



Here's an example.
If you are going to write a "romance" story about Yu-Gi-Oh! set in ancient then you should include some actual facts.
Polygamy= The Pharoah had to have multiple wives so he can make sure that he had enough hiers. Infant mortality was pretty high back then.

Back then they didn't have a word for queen. They used a word or phrase that was close to "chief wife" ,"God's wife" or "Great wife".
The "chief wife's" duty is to lead the other wives and serve by the Pharoah's side.

Incest= Egyptain royalty only married with in the family. Males would marry thier sisters, cousins and sometimes even thier own mothers or daughters.
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Last edited by Thundercat : 05-03-2006 at 05:37 PM.
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